Fig. 5: Thermal tolerance of species measured in laboratory studies (CTmax) and predicted from the Metabolic Index (ATmax). | Nature

Fig. 5: Thermal tolerance of species measured in laboratory studies (CTmax) and predicted from the Metabolic Index (ATmax).

From: Metabolic trait diversity shapes marine biogeography

Fig. 5

a, Histograms of the aerobic thermal maxima at rest (\({{\rm{AT}}}_{{\rm{\max }}}^{{\rm{rest}}}\); coloured bars) of species derived from measured hypoxia traits and critical thermal maxima (CTmax; green line), which were derived from loss of physiological function experiments. Grey lines depict the relative frequency of global upper ocean temperatures (solid, monthly depth-resolved upper 150 m; dotted, satellite-based daytime Sea Surface Temperature  (Methods), scaled to the peak number of species for visualization. b, Active ATmax based on the hypoxia traits and Φcrit of all species. Activity levels reduce thermal tolerance from values well above ocean temperatures (grey lines) for species at rest (a) to temperatures that limit species ranges (b). ATmax is the maximum aerobic temperature permitting atmospheric \({p}_{{{\rm{O}}}_{2}}\) to meet resting or active metabolic O2 demands, computed (see Methods) by solving for T in equation (1), with \({p}_{{{\rm{O}}}_{2}}={P}_{{\rm{atm}}}\) and Φ = 1 (for resting \({{\rm{AT}}}_{{\rm{\max }}}^{{\rm{rest}}}\)) or Φ = Φcrit (for active ATmax).

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