Flow chemistry

Flow chemistry is the development and study of chemical reactions whereby reactants are combined by pumping fluids, including solutions of reagents, through tubes at known rates. The relative proportions of the reactants are controlled by their concentrations and relative flow rates. These reactions can take advantage of rapid mixing and surface to volume ratio effects.

Latest Research and Reviews

News and Comment

  • News & Views |

    Small-molecule drug discovery and development is limited by the ability of chemists to readily synthesize and purify new compounds with suitable chemical diversity. Now, a new twist on solid-phase chemical synthesis has enabled rapid and simplified synthesis of pharmaceutically relevant small molecules.

    • Mark S. Kerr
    •  & Kevin P. Cole
    Nature Chemistry 13, 399-401
  • News & Views |

    Fusion systems have been designed that link enzymes to cofactors and immobilization modules through appropriate synthetic spacers. These modular biocatalysts (assembling catalysis, cofactor provision/regeneration and assisted immobilization) are suited to heterogeneous biocatalysis systems and can be efficiently used in continuous flow reactors.

    • Martina Letizia Contente
    •  & Francesco Molinari
    Nature Catalysis 2, 951-952
  • Research Highlights |

    A rapid synthesis of the antibacterial drug linezolid using flow chemistry has been reported that does not require isolation or purification of any intermediates and is completed in seven synthetic steps

    • Stephen G. Davey
  • News & Views |

    Flow chemistry has grown in stature as a technique with the potential to deliver synthetic complexity with assembly-line-like efficiency. Application of flow technology to the front-line antimalarial drug artemisinin promises to revolutionalize treatment.

    • Kevin Booker-Milburn
    Nature Chemistry 4, 433-435