Editorial Board Highlights

Interviews

Read exclusive interviews with some of our board members and learn about their research and their experience as a Scientific Reports board member.

 

Dr Carlo Cannistraci

Dr Carlo Cannistraci

Dr Carlo Cannistraci is a Theoretical Engineer and Editorial Board Member for Scientific Reports.

1.  What is your current research focused on?

I am a Theoretical Engineer; my research interests include subjects at the interface between physics of complex systems, complex networks and machine intelligence, with particular interest in brain/bio-inspired computing for Big Data analysis, and applications in precision biomedicine and neuroscience.

2. What has been your biggest challenge and your greatest achievement in your career so far?

Mapping complex networks to their latent geometric spaces helps to investigate, understand and predict the structure and function of complex systems. My biggest challenge and greatest achievement was to recently propose a class of intelligent machines for efficient embedding of large real networks to the hyperbolic space, with future impact on big-network-data analysis in biology, medicine and social science. This work was proposed in the article: Machine learning meets complex networks via coalescent embedding in the hyperbolic space, A Muscoloni, JM Thomas, S Ciucci, G Bianconi, CV Cannistraci. Nature Communications 8 (1), 1, 2017.

3. Why did you decide to become a board member?

I love to support other colleagues to improve their studies and to achieve high standards in their publications. This is the spirit of the review process: to offer feedback that improves science and its dissemination with a clear benefit for all of the scientific community.

4. What do you like most about being a board member for Scientific Reports?

Being an Editor for Scientific Reports for me is something more than being a normal Editor. The spirit of Scientific Reports is the spirit of ‘freedom and equal opportunity’ in science. I like the fact that Scientific Reports accept articles according to the only requirement that they should be technically correct. This ensures that the article selection is not biased by the opinion of a ‘group of experts’ that, in my opinion, can be also risky, because very innovative ideas that are against the mainstream in science might be rejected. I feel that being an editor for Scientific Reports allows me to sponsor the freedom to publish new scientific ideas which are technically correct but might not be recognised by a conservative establishment of experts.

 

Dr Joana Maria Ramis

Dr Joana Maria Ramis

Dr Joana Maria Ramis is a Miguel Servet Researcher at the Balearic Islands Health Research Institute (IdISBa), as well as Adjunct Lecturer at the University of the Balearic Islands, Spain.

1. What is your current research focused on?

My research is focused on the development of new therapies and biomaterials for restorative and regenerative medicine and its translation to clinical practice.  My newest research line focus on the approach to cell-free regenerative medicine through the use of extracellular vesicles derived from different cells types.

2. What has been your biggest challenge and your greatest achievement in your career so far?

My biggest challenge and greatest achievement has been, and keeps being, reconciling family life and my research career. 

3. Why did you decide to become a board member?

I considered the offer to become a board member as a great opportunity to deepen in the knowledge of the review process and to be an active part of it. Publication of our results is an important part of our work as researchers, and before becoming a board member for Scientific Reports, I have only acted as author or as reviewer, thus, to act as editorial board member was a role I was interested in exploring.  

4. What do you like most about being a board member for Scientific Reports?

Being a board member for Scientific Reports allows me to be updated in the ongoing research in my areas of expertise and to really deepen in the technical aspects of the manuscripts I handle. On top of that, the most positive aspect of being a board member is how much I learn from the interaction with the reviewers and the authors and how manuscripts improve from it.

5. You are leading one of our Guest Edited Collections. What interested you about becoming a Guest Editor? What is your Collection focused on?

Yes, I am leading the Special Collection entitled “Extracellular vesicles in cell biology and medicine”. The collection is focused on extracellular vesicles (EV), cell-derived membranous structures known as intercellular communicators exerting their function by exchanging their cargo. EV research is a burgeoning field with a high number of researchers from different disciplines working in this field. This Special Collection intents to deliver an up-to-date overview on some of the current developments in the field.  
To increase my interaction with other researchers of the field is what most interested me about becoming a Guest Editor for the Collection.

6. Which is your favourite Scientific Reports paper?

It is really difficult to select one single paper! I will list you some:

Cells release subpopulations of exosomes with distinct molecular and biological properties.
Willms, E.; Johansson, H. J.; Mäger, I.; Lee, Y.; Blomberg, K. E. M.; Sadik, M.; Alaarg, A.; Smith, C. I. E.; Lehtiö, J.; El Andaloussi, S.; Wood, M. J. A.; Vader, P.

Size-Exclusion Chromatography-based isolation minimally alters Extracellular Vesicles’ characteristics compared to precipitating agents.
Gámez-Valero, A.; Monguió-Tortajada, M.; Carreras-Planella, L.; Franquesa, M. la; Beyer, K.; Borràs, F. E. 

Labeling Extracellular Vesicles for Nanoscale Flow Cytometry.
Morales-Kastresana, A.; Telford, B.; Musich, T. A.; McKinnon, K.; Clayborne, C.; Braig, Z.; Rosner, A.; Demberg, T.; Watson, D. C.; Karpova, T. S.; Freeman, G. J.; DeKruyff, R. H.; Pavlakis, G. N.; Terabe, M.; Robert-Guroff, M.; Berzofsky, J. A.; Jones, J. C.

Bone marrow stromal/stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles regulate osteoblast activity and differentiation in vitro and promote bone regeneration in vivo
Qin, Y.; Wang, L.; Gao, Z.; Chen, G.; Zhang, C. 

Exosomes derived from human adipose mensenchymal stem cells accelerates cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts
Hu, L.; Wang, J.; Zhou, X.; Xiong, Z.; Zhao, J.; Yu, R.; Huang, F.; Zhang, H.; Chen, L. 

 

Professor Xiaochun Li

Professor Xiaochun Li

Professor Xiaochun Li is the Raytheon Endowed Chair in Manufacturing Engineering at the Departments of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering & Materials Science and Engineering at UCLA, USA. He is also a Guest Editor for the Nanotechnology enabled metallurgy Collection, which is currently welcoming submissions. 

1. What has been your biggest challenge and your greatest achievement in your career so far?

The biggest challenge has been to bridge science and manufacturing for long term impact. The greatest achievement in my career so far is the discovery of the nano-particle self-dispersion and stabilisation mechanism in molten metals, which establishes a scientific foundation for nanotechnology enabled metallurgy.

2. Why did you decide to become a board member?

Being a board member is a good opportunity to provide a valuable service to the technical community.

3. What do you like most about being a board member for Scientific Reports?

My greatest pleasure is to help make the review process better, while having the opportunity to Guest Edit a special Collection.

4. You are leading one of our Guest Edited Collections. What interested you about becoming a Guest Editor? What is your Collection focused on?

I really like the opportunity to promote an important emerging field, Nanotechnology enabled metallurgy.

5. Which is your favourite Scientific Reports paper?

Core-shell nanoparticle arrays double the strength of steel
J.-B. Seol et al.

 

Professor Luciano Bosso

Professor Luciano BossoProfessor Luciano Bosso is an Assistant Professor of Ecology at the University of Naples Federico II.

1. What is your current research focused on?

I am an ecologist expert in ecological modelling and GIS analysis. My main research interests include conservation biology, global change ecology, biogeography and invasion ecology and the application of species distribution models, niche analysis, risk mapping, conservation gap analysis, landscape ecology, spatial analysis, species connectivity and corridor network simulation. 

2. What have been your biggest challenge and your greatest achievement in your career so far?

My biggest challenge is to make scientific research more accessible and comprehensible to a wider non-scientific audience. I am particularly devoted to increasing the ecological knowledge of non-experts. Several of my studies have informed policy makers about best management strategies of protected areas in Italy and Europe, and I consider this use of my research as my greatest achievement.

3. Why is Scientific Reports one of your favourite journals?

Scientific Reports is a multidisciplinary journal that publishes scientifically valid primary research from all areas of the natural sciences and beyond. I have always admired the quality and rigour of the scientific studies published in this prestigious journal.

4. Why did you decide to become a board member?

Considering the crucial role that editors have in scientific communication, I was looking for an opportunity where I can apply and especially improve/broaden my editorial skills as well as find professional and personal satisfaction both as an editor and a scientist. I am very grateful to Scientific Reports for this exciting opportunity.

5. What do you like most about being a board member for Scientific Reports?

I am particularly satisfied by the opportunity to enrich my background, collaborate in an international context, and contribute to the journal’s high-quality publication standards.

6. Which is your favourite Scientific Reports paper?

It is really difficult to select a single paper! I was really impressed by these recent publications:

 Integrating experimental and distribution data to predict future species patterns.
Kotta et al. (2019).

Risk of biodiversity collapse under climate change in the Afro-Arabian region.
Soultan et al. (2019). 

Climate change-driven range losses among bumblebee species are poised to accelerate.
Sirois-Delisle and Kerr (2019).

Modeling the distributions of tegu lizards in native and potential invasive ranges.  
Jarnevich et al. (2018). 

Assessment of the effect of climate changes in the Late Pleistocene and