Collections

  • Series |

    In this article series, Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology examines the cutting-edge techniques and technologies currently applied in gastrointestinal and liver research and clinical practice, and the approaches that might be available to investigators, clinicians and surgeons in the future.

    Image: PhotoDisc/ Getty Images
  • Series |

    Fuelled by increasing obesity rates, NAFLD has emerged as a leading global cause of chronic liver disease in the past few decades. Despite growing prevalence, the factors influencing NAFLD development and subsequent progression to NASH, liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are poorly understood. In this article series, Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology explores the epidemiology of NAFLD, disease mechanisms and therapeutics, and clinical approaches to diagnosis and management.

    Image: Caio Bracey
  • Series |

    The gastrointestinal system comprises a plethora of different cell types that develop, interact, specialize and function in a complex, tightly regulated process and, in many cases, show remarkable plasticity. In this article series, Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology explores different cell biology and developmental pathways involved in gastrointestinal health and disease, the role of stem and progenitor cells in tissue development and regeneration and recent advances in bioengineering, which might shape clinical approaches in the near future.

    Image: PASIEKA
  • Focus |

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease with poor outcomes and is predicted to be the second leading cause of cancer death in some regions by 2030.

    Image: Laura Marshall
  • Collection |

    Research into women’s health has suffered from historical neglect and lack of funding.

    Image: Lara Crow/Springer Nature Limited
  • Series |

    In this article series by Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology, basic, translational and clinical topics in neurogastroenterology are explored.

    Image: Laura Marshall
  • Collection |

    The Key Advances in Gastroenterology & Hepatology collection offers expert insight into the most important discoveries made each year, and is an essential resource for students, physicians and clinical researchers.

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    Viral hepatitis is a global public health problem, and the burden of disease is increasing. In 2016, spurred by development of effective new treatments for hepatitis C and expanding access to hepatitis B vaccination, the 194 Member States of the WHO committed to eliminating viral hepatitis as a public health threat by 2030. Here, Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology explores areas vital to meeting this ambitious target, from basic viral research to public policy.

    Image: KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY
  • Collection |

    This collection of research, review and comment from Nature Research celebrates the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine awarded to Harvey J. Alter, Michael Houghton and Charles M. Rice "for the discovery of hepatitis C virus".

    Image: Springer Nature/The Nobel Foundation/Imagesource
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    Nutrition and diet influence human health and development through their effects on the gut microbiome and host immune homeostasis.

    Image: Alisdair Macdonald
  • Collection |

    In this Collection, we bring you articles published by Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology that cover the COVID-19 pandemic and its implications for the care of patients with gastrointestinal and liver diseases.

    Image: Laura Marshall/Springer Nature Limited
  • Collection |

    New technologies to study stem cells have increased our knowledge about their physiological roles and contributions to development, ageing, regeneration and disease. This collection showcases research articles, reviews and protocols from across the Nature journals to highlight the striking advances made in basic and translational stem cell research.

    Image: Benedetta Artegiani and Delilah Hendriks, Hubrecht Institute, Utrecht, The Netherlands.