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  • In 2017 Professor Frances S. Ligler was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame for her inventions in portable optical biosensors. Professor Ligler now talks to Nature Chemistry about the challenge of developing new sensor designs into reliable products, and some of the pitfalls to avoid in the development process.

    • Russell Johnson
    Q&A
  • Bruce C. Gibb offers some suggestions to chemists for how they can help save the world, one nudge at a time.

    • Bruce C. Gibb
    Thesis
  • Claire Murray ponders on the attraction benzene — a small, seemingly simple molecule — has long exerted on scientists, some of the insights gained through its exploration, and the varied applications found for this hexagonal ring and its derivatives.

    • Claire Murray
    In Your Element
  • Christine M. Le takes a look at 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose and explains how this radioactive sugar could help to save your life.

    • Christine M. Le
    In Your Element
  • Jennifer Rudd reflects on how, in recent history, carbon dioxide has been largely vilified for its role in global warming. Yet responsibility for the current climate crisis lies squarely with humans, not a molecule that is crucial for life on Earth.

    • Jennifer A. Rudd
    In Your Element
  • Athina Anastasaki from ETH Zürich talks to Nature Chemistry about her career, her research in polymer chemistry and the challenges she dealt with in her academic pathway.

    • Kathryn Ashe
    Q&A
  • Miao Hong, based at the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, tells Nature Chemistry about her work in sustainable polymer design and her thoughts about the future of this field.

    • Kathryn Ashe
    Q&A
  • Chemistry plays a key role in tackling today’s challenges and ensuring a sustainable future. Since 2019, IUPAC has been identifying technologies with the potential to advance our society and improve our quality of life.

    • Fernando Gomollón-Bel
    • Javier García-Martínez
    Comment
  • Amina Schartup relates how our understanding of methylmercury has changed in the 170 years since it was discovered — as well as some of the disasters that occurred along the way.

    • Amina T. Schartup
    In Your Element
  • Bruce C. Gibb suggests it’s time to put student testing to the test and that everyone should be given the space they need to succeed.

    • Bruce C. Gibb
    Thesis
  • Lara Mosunmola Lalemi, PhD student at the University of Bristol and founder of the Creative Tuition Collective, shares with Nature Chemistry some of her projects — from climate chemistry to social justice — to improve our environment in all senses of the term.

    • Anne Pichon
    Q&A
  • John Woodland and Kelly Chibale retrace the tumultuous history of quinine from a medicine — used as a tool for colonialism — to a puzzling chemical target, a fluorescence standard and a key ingredient in popular drinks.

    • John G. Woodland
    • Kelly Chibale
    In Your Element
  • Michelle Francl explores how chemists put line structures to work.

    • Michelle Francl
    Thesis
  • Jennifer Leigh and Jennifer Hiscock, both from the University of Kent, UK, share with Nature Chemistry the origins of the Women In Supramolecular Chemistry (WISC) network, as well as some of the projects underway to try to help change the culture of this area of chemistry from the bottom up.

    • Anne Pichon
    Q&A
  • Sibusiso Biyela, science communicator and journalist in South Africa, talks to Nature Chemistry about the decolonization of science through science communication.

    • Anne Pichon
    Q&A
  • Bruce C. Gibb reminds us that buffers are not necessarily innocent bystanders and that they can bind to biomacromolecules too.

    • Bruce C. Gibb
    Thesis
  • Michelle Francl reminds #ChemistsWhoCook to look at the chemistry behind the cooking.

    • Michelle Francl
    Thesis
  • The periodic table of elements should be celebrated not only for the order it brings, but also for the fascinating stories underlying this icon of science, suggests Juris Meija.

    • Juris Meija
    Thesis
  • Jeremy Frey, professor of physical chemistry at the University of Southampton and principal investigator for the AI3SD Network+, talks with Nature Chemistry about the perils of uncertainty in the quality of machine learning data and the synergies between AI and other technologies.

    • Russell Johnson
    Q&A