Content Types

To submit one of the following content types, please read the formatting details below, then follow the submission guidelines:

  • Article
  • Review*
  • Perspective*
  • Comment*
  • Correspondence*
  • Matters Arising – see specialist submission process here.

For more information on these content types, please contact Nature Chemistry:

  • News and Views*    
  • Meeting Report*
  • Book & Arts*
  • Feature*
  • In Your Element*
  • Q&A*
  • Thesis*

*These content types should not include original (previously unpublished) research findings and may only contain minimal new supporting data. As they are non-primary articles they are not eligible for Open Access and can only be published using the subscription-based publishing route.

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Article

Nature Chemistry publishes original research in one format, Articles, which may range from what are typically considered to be short 'Communications', through to more in-depth studies. Regardless of the length, an Article is an important research study of general interest and/or utility to the chemistry community. Articles are generally 3–8 printed journal pages in length. 

Articles are peer reviewed and include received/accepted dates.

Format

  • Main text – up to 3,000 words, excluding Abstract, Methods, References and Figure/Table captions.
  • Abstract – 150 words; cannot include any references. 
  • Display items – up to 6 items (figures and/or tables; please note that we do not use schemes). 
  • Extended data – up to 10 figures. 
  • Article structure: 
    • INTRODUCTION: The main text of an Article begins with an introduciton (without heading) of referenced text that expands on the background of the work (some overlap with the Abstract is acceptable).
    • RESULTS & DISCUSSION: The introduction is followed by separate sections headed 'Results' and 'Discussion'. The Results section may be divided by topical subheadings, but the Discussion section should be succinct and may not contain subheadings. If the results and discussion are intertwined throughout the manuscript, then you may instead use the heading 'Results and discussion' – in this case, we strongly encourage you to use subheadings to break up the text and help the reader navigate the article.
    • CONCLUSION: Authors may include a section called 'Conclusions' at the end of the paper.
    • METHODS: Authors are strongly encouraged to include a Methods section. This should not exceed 3,000 words and should be subdivided by topical subheadings as appropriate. The Methods section cannot contain figures or tables (essential display items should be included as Extended Data figures or as part of the main Supplementary Information PDF file), but non-graphical equations are permitted.
  • References – as a guideline, we typically recommend up to 50.

  • Articles may be accompanied by Supplementary Information. 

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Review

A Review is an authoritative, balanced and scholarly survey of recent developments in a research field. Although Reviews should be recognized as scholarly by specialists in the field, they should be written with a view to informing non-specialist readers. Thus, Reviews should be presented using simple prose, avoiding excessive jargon and technical detail.

The scope of a Review should be broad enough that it is not dominated by the work of a single laboratory, and particularly not by the authors' own work. Unpublished primary research data are not permitted in Reviews.

Reviews include received/accepted dates. Reviews are always peer-reviewed to ensure factual accuracy, appropriate citations and scholarly balance, and they are edited in consultation with the editorial team.

Format

  • Abstract – 150 words; cannot include any references. 
  • Main text – up to 6,000 words.
  • Up to 8 display items (figures, tables and/or boxes).
  • References – up to 100 (exceptions are possible in special cases). 

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Perspective

Perspectives are a second format for scholarly reviews and discussions of the primary research literature.

Perspectives are shorter than Reviews and may be narrower in scope. They typically present a focused review of a rapidly moving area of science or discuss a developing field of research that is not yet mature enough to justify a full review. Perspectives may also advocate a controversial position or present a speculative hypothesis. Two articles advocating opposite sides in a research controversy are normally published as Perspectives. Unpublished primary research data are not permitted in Perspectives.

Perspectives include received/accepted dates. Perspectives are always peer-reviewed to ensure factual accuracy, appropriate citations and scholarly balance, and they are edited in consultation with the editorial team.

Format

  • Abstract – 150 words; cannot include any references. 
  • Main text – up to 3,000 words.
  • Up to 4 display items (figures, tables and/or boxes).
  • References – up to 50 (exceptions are possible in special cases). 

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Comment

A Comment article focuses on policy, science and society, or purely scientific issues related to chemistry (including historical accounts of a particular discovery or development) and are usually commissioned by the editors, but proposals are welcome. They should be of immediate interest to a broad readership and should be written in an accessible, non-technical style. 

Comment articles may not contain primary research data, although they may present 'sociological' data (funding trends, demographics, bibliographic data and so on). Comment articles may be peer-reviewed at the editor's discretion and do not include received/accepted dates.

Format

  • Length – can vary, but typically 1–3 published pages.
  • There are no specific structural guidelines, but display items (figures, tables and/or boxes) are encouraged as appropriate.
  • References – up to 25 (exceptions are possible in special cases). 

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Correspondence

The Correspondence section provides a forum for comment on issues relevant to the journal’s community. This format may not be used for presentation of research data or analysis. 

Correspondence pieces may be peer-reviewed at the editor's discretion.

Format

  • Length – typically between 300–800 words.
  • May include one display item.
  • References – up to 10 references. 

Note that Correspondence pieces are not technical comments on peer-reviewed research papers; these should be submitted as Matters Arising.

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Matters Arising

Matters Arising are exceptionally interesting and timely scientific comments and clarifications on original research papers published in Nature Chemistry. These comments should ideally be based on contemporary knowledge rather than subsequent scientific developments.

For detailed information on how to submit a Matters Arising, please follow instructions here.

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News & Views

News & Views articles inform readers about the latest advances in chemistry, as reported in recently published papers (in Nature Chemistry or elsewhere). 

Most articles are commissioned, but proposals for papers to be covered in this section can be made to the editorial team — although suggestions must be received either in advance of the paper being published or shortly thereafter to ensure our coverage is as timely as possible.

News & Views articles are not peer-reviewed, but undergo editing in consultation with the author.

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Meeting Reports

Meeting Reports inform readers about the latest developments in chemistry, as reported at scientific conferences or meetings. 

Most articles are commissioned, but proposals for meetings to be covered in this section can be made to the editorial team— although suggestions must be received in advance of the meeting taking place to ensure our coverage is as timely as possible. Meeting Reports may not be written by anyone involved in the conference organization, but rather by an independent speaker or attendee of the meeting.

Meeting Reports are not peer-reviewed, but undergo editing in consultation with the author.

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Books & Arts

The Books & Arts section publishes timely reviews of books and other technological or cultural resources/events of interest to chemists. 

Most articles are commissioned, but proposals for books, resources or events to be covered in this section can be made to the editorial team—although suggestions must be received either in advance of the book or resource being published (or the event being staged) or shortly thereafter to ensure our coverage is as timely as possible.

Books & Arts articles are not peer-reviewed, but undergo editing in consultation with the author.

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Feature

Features are a flexible format that can cover technical, commercial and historical aspects of any topic relevant to our readership. They are typically written by members of the editorial team or are commissioned by them, but external proposals will be considered.

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In Your Element

In Your Element essays are one-page pieces in the journal (each with a single image) that offer an accessible account of a chemical element, compound or substance.  Most articles are commissioned, but external proposals can be made to the editorial team.

In Your Element essays are not peer-reviewed, but undergo editing in consultation with the author.

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Q&A

Q&A pieces are interviews with individuals on topics that will be of interest to the wider chemistry community.  The vast majority of Q&A articles are commissioned, but external proposals can be made to the editorial team.

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Thesis

Thesis articles offer a flexible format for an author to write about a topic related to chemistry, but without necessarily offering a strong opinion as would typically be expected in a Comment article.  The vast majority of Thesis articles are commissioned, but external proposals can be made to the editorial team.

Thesis articles are not peer-reviewed, but undergo editing in consultation with the author.