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  • The International Union for Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) celebrates its centenary this year, but its beginnings were far from easy. Roberto Lalli and Jaume Navarro reflect on IUPAP’s evolving role in promoting international cooperation.

    • Roberto Lalli
    • Jaume Navarro
    Comment
  • Fifty years since the publication of Phil Anderson’s ‘More is different’, we ponder how reductionism and emergence shape the relationship between physics and other disciplines.

    Editorial
  • Light–matter interactions are already used to induce new states in condensed-matter systems — such as in Floquet engineering. Combining these ideas with the vectorial properties of structured light promises to further expand the toolbox for optical control of quantum properties of matter.

    • Yanan Dai
    • Atreyie Ghosh
    • Hrvoje Petek
    Comment
  • Artificial intelligence may uncover new scientific concepts that defy human intuition, but will researchers be able to understand and operate with them? This scenario might seem like science fiction, but physicists have faced it before.

    • Iulia Georgescu
    Feature
  • A paper in Physical Review Letters shows how algae cells collectively form different patterns in response to light.

    • Ankita Anirban
    In Brief
  • A paper in Nature Physics shows how the collective chiral motion of malaria single-cell organisms in mosquito saliva is driven by their physical properties

    • Ankita Anirban
    In Brief
  • A paper in Science Advances shows how the transition of bacteria cells from collective active swarms to biofilms is driven by both biological and physical mechanisms.

    • Ankita Anirban
    In Brief
  • Getting the most from power-law-type data can be challenging. James Sethna points out some of the pitfalls in studying power laws arising from emergent scale invariance, as well as important opportunities.

    • James P. Sethna
    Comment
  • Past and present chairs of the Division of Particles and Fields of the American Physical Society explain how the high-energy physics community in the US decides the priorities for research through regular planning exercises that started 40 years ago at Snowmass, Colorado.

    • Joel Butler
    • R. Sekhar Chivukula
    • Priscilla Cushman
    Comment
  • Most physics seminars are seen by dozens at most, but the 2012 announcement of the discovery of the Higgs boson reached hundreds of thousands of viewers, including non-physicists. Achintya Rao asks what can this event tell us about opening up science to the general public?

    • Achintya Rao
    Feature
  • In July 2012, the discovery of a particle “compatible with the Higgs boson” was announced at CERN. To mark the anniversary, here are ten books — in no particular order — about the physics, the discovery, the people and the technology that made it possible.

    Editorial
  • In the 20th century, Bell Labs was a renowned industrial research lab in the US, known as the birthplace of the transistor and for the discovery of cosmic microwave background radiation. It was also home to a 40-year minority outreach programme that went on to create a generation of Black scientists. What can initiatives today learn from the success of this fellowship?

    • Ankita Anirban
    Feature
  • How did the leopard get its spots? According to Rudyard Kipling’s 1902 children’s story, the leopard’s spots were created by fingerprints of an Ethiopian man. Fifty years later, Alan Turing laid the mathematical foundations of our understanding of leopard spots today.

    • Ankita Anirban
    Research Highlight
  • Twenty years ago, the particle physics community launched Indico, an open-source software package for handling all aspects of meetings. This is brief guide to what Indico can do, and how the wider physics community could benefit from adopting it.

    • Tim Smith
    Comment
  • A paper in Journal of the Royal Society Interface reports the physics of how the structure of part of the ear of wheat contributes to fungal spores being agglomerated by the dew cycle.

    • Zoe Budrikis
    Research Highlight
  • Machine learning is no longer restricted to data analysis and is now increasingly being used in theory, experiment and simulation, that is, all traditional aspects of research. Does this perhaps signal the dawn of a new paradigm?

    Editorial
  • An article in Physical Reviews X shows that quantum correlations can enhance the expressivity of generative models, suggesting new ways to develop improved (quantum-inspired) classical machine learning methods.

    • Iulia Georgescu
    Research Highlight
  • A paper in Physical Review Letters uses experiments and simulations to understand the mechanical properties of bird nests.

    • Ankita Anirban
    Research Highlight
  • Sonja Franke-Arnold discusses the first experimental generation of light with orbital angular momentum three decades ago and outlines the subsequent advances.

    • Sonja Franke-Arnold
    Research Highlight