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Supporting innovative research into the human microbiome

Researchers are embracing the gut microbiome. Our microflora do more than keep the intestines in check, they also affect our immune system and mental health. These new grants support investigators exploring the microbiome’s influence.

The Global Grants for Gut Health

Awarded grants 2020

We warmly congratulate the three 2020 recipients of the Global Grants for Gut Health, which support studies seeking to elucidate unexplored host–microbe communication pathways and develop new strategies for preventing metabolic diseases and functional gastrointestinal disorders.

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Marco Jost will use small-intestine organoids and his expertise in RNA sequencing and CRISPR technologies to study host–microbiome molecular communication. He will examine how these interactions might influence the physiology of other organs.

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With his Global Grant for Gut Health, Purna Kashyap plans to create the first humanized mouse model of the small intestine to determine its role in modulating intestinal physiology and influencing gastrointestinal disease symptoms.

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Awarded grants 2019

Introducing the projects that aim to elucidate the role of protists in food sensitivity, identify novel bioactives to prevent or reduce inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and look for antibody–antigen interactions in microbiome-related diseases.

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Biochemist and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) specialist, Jakob Begun, will use his Global Grant for Gut Health to explore how microbial power could limit IBD progression.

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Awarded grants 2018

We’re proud to present two highly competitive projects that investigate long-term evolution in the gut microbiome and drug-microbiome interactions.

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Adding to research focused on the overall composition of the gut microbiome, biologist Isabel Gordo will use her Global Grant for Gut Health to explore the evolutionary path of one common gut bacterium, Escherichia coli, inside living animals.

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After many years studying the gastrointestinal tract, pharmacologist and senior physiology lecturer Niall Hyland will use his Global Grant for Gut Health to examine how the microbiome influences the ability to metabolise anti-depressant or anti-psychotic drugs.

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