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A framework for examining justice in food system transformations research

Global interest and investment in food system transformation should be accompanied by critical analysis of its justice implications. Multiple forms of injustice, and the potential role that research might play in exacerbating these, are key considerations for those engaging with food system transformation and justice.

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Fig. 1: A conceptual framework for applying justice lenses to the study of food system transformation.

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Acknowledgements

This paper is the product of work supported by a grant from the UK Research and Innovation’s Global Challenges Research Fund (EP/T02397X/1). The work was also implemented as part of the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), which is carried out with support from the CGIAR Trust Fund and through bilateral funding agreements. For details please visit https://ccafs.cgiar.org/donors. The views expressed in this document cannot be taken to reflect the official opinions of these organizations.

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All authors contributed to the ideas presented in the manuscript. S.W. wrote the manuscript. All authors contributed to redrafting and editing.

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Correspondence to Stephen Whitfield.

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Peer review information Nature Food thanks Lauren Baker for their contribution to the peer review of this work.

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Whitfield, S., Apgar, M., Chabvuta, C. et al. A framework for examining justice in food system transformations research. Nat Food 2, 383–385 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s43016-021-00304-x

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