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Know Your Model: A brief history of making mutant mouse genetic models

For over a century, researchers have used mice as models and adapted many new methods to create novel mutations in them. In the past 100+ years, we have gone from breeding strains for selected traits to inducing random mutations throughout the genome to creating designer alleles with multiple functions. Each method offers opportunities and challenges for researchers as they try to address specific research questions with mouse models.

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Fig. 1: Alleles Entered in MGI Per Generation Method Per Year from 1911 -2019.

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Acknowledgements

MGD is supported by program project grant HG000330 from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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Correspondence to Susan M. Bello.

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Bello, S.M., Perry, M.N. & Smith, C.L. Know Your Model: A brief history of making mutant mouse genetic models. Lab Anim 50, 263–266 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41684-021-00853-5

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