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Dyspepsia

No association between dyspepsia and increased mortality in the community

Multivariate analysis of the data from a longitudinal 10-year follow-up study by Ford et al. shows that the likelihood of death in individuals with dyspepsia is not significantly different from the likelihood of death in individuals who do not have dyspepsia. The authors obtained the data for their study from individuals taking part in a commmunity-based Helicobacter pylori screening program. Of the 8,323 individuals for whom symptom data were available at the follow up (out of the 8,407 individuals initially enrolled), 3,169 had dyspepsia. There were 137 deaths during the follow-up period.

ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER

  1. Ford, A. C. et al. Effect of dyspepsia on survival: a longitudinal 10-year follow-up study. Am. J. Gastroenterol. doi:10.1038/ajg.2012.69

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No association between dyspepsia and increased mortality in the community. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol 9, 245 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1038/nrgastro.2012.78

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