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Lessons on longevity from budding yeast

An Erratum to this article was published on 01 April 2010

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Abstract

The past decade has seen fundamental advances in our understanding of the ageing process and raised optimism that interventions to slow ageing may be on the horizon. Studies of budding yeast have made immense contributions to this progress. Yeast longevity factors have now been shown to modulate ageing in invertebrate and mammalian models, and studies of yeast have resulted in some of the best candidates for anti-ageing drugs currently in development. The first interventions to slow human ageing may spring from the humble yeast.

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Figure 1: Damage accumulation in yeast ageing.
Figure 2: Carbon metabolism and yeast ageing.
Figure 3: Modulation of yeast ageing by TOR and Sir2.

Change history

  • 01 April 2010

    Nature 464, 513–519 (2010) Figure 3 of this Review contained a minor error. The correct figure is shown below.

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Acknowledgements

Studies related to this topic in the Kaeberlein laboratory have been supported by US National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant R21AG031965, a Pilot Project grant from the University of Washington Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging (NIH grant P30AG013280) and a New Scholar in Aging Award from the Ellison Medical Foundation.

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M.K. has been issued a patent issued for the identification of ageing genes through large-scale analysis (US patent 7,622,271).

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Reprints and permissions information is available at http://www.nature.com/reprints. The author declares competing financial interests: details accompany the full-text HTML version of the paper at http://www.nature.com/nature. Correspondence should be addressed to the author (kaeber@u.washington.edu).

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Kaeberlein, M. Lessons on longevity from budding yeast. Nature 464, 513–519 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1038/nature08981

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